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Hiatus Hernias

Printed From: Barrett's Support Forum
Category: Barrett's Support Forum
Forum Name: Support Forum
Forum Discription: News and Events
URL: http://www.barrettscampaign.org.uk/forum//forum_posts.asp?TID=1999
Printed Date: 17áOctá2019 at 8:37pm


Topic: Hiatus Hernias
Posted By: Zippypop
Subject: Hiatus Hernias
Date Posted: 25áNová2018 at 11:53am
How common are HH's with barretts and also do we know what the increased risk is if you have one?

Can those with acid reflux and a HH really avoid barretts or is it just a matter of time ?

I wonder what the percentage is of those with a HH but don't have barretts.   That would be interesting to know



Replies:
Posted By: chrisrob
Date Posted: 25áNová2018 at 12:57pm
I guess we don't actually know.

Hiatus Hernias are actually very common in the population - perhaps due to obesity but it's also possible to be born with one.
The stomach partly herniates from the abdomen into the thorax via the hiatus hole in the diaphragm. This displaces the musculature the effects the lower oesophageal sphincter thereby permitting reflux of stomach contents. If this contains acid and bile, the body may develop Barrett's cells as a shield or armour in an attempt to protect against damage to the body.
( https://sites.google.com/site/downwithacid2/home/complications/barrett-s-oesophagus/put-simply - See this page from the Down With Acid encyclopaedia. )

Not everyone with acid reflux develops Barrett's. We don't know why some do and some don't, it's the subject of much research, but genetics probably plays a part.

Hiatus hernia can develop as we get older as our muscles get weaker. It is estimated that by the time we're 60, between 50% and 60% of us will have developed one.

The Mayo Clinic in America suggests Barrett's could be present in 5% of the population (ie 1 in 10 of those with HH) which would mean about 3 million of us with it in the UK though only just over 100,000 actually know we have it. We are the lucky ones: it's those who don't know they have it who may not know until it is too late.

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http://www.barrettswessex.org.uk - www.barrettswessex.org.uk


Posted By: Zippypop
Date Posted: 25áNová2018 at 2:52pm
Thanks Chris

To save me starting another thread could you tell me the importance of chronic inflammation ?
My doc thinks I had it as I was off meds 10 days prior to scope.   I thought chronic meant long-term so 10 days isn't long?

He says it may also be a touch of gastritis causing the chronic inflammation? Didn't
Give me any other meds and just to continue with PPI.

Diagnosis from biopsy report was chronic inflammation of the gastric cardiac type

I think I am going to request another scope as next one isn't for 3 years.


Posted By: chrisrob
Date Posted: 25áNová2018 at 3:05pm
Inflammation will be due to the refluxing acid. In the oesophagus, it's oesophagitis; in the stomach it's gastritis.
Chronic does mean persisting. I guess 10 days is sufficient for that epithet.
PPIs will reduce the acid to give the inflammation a chance to heal - which may take a couple of weeks or so.

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http://www.barrettswessex.org.uk - www.barrettswessex.org.uk


Posted By: Zippypop
Date Posted: 25áNová2018 at 6:32pm
Thanks Chris.   I always thought reflux was limited to the esophagus not the stomach too?. We learn every day......Thanks to you


Posted By: chrisrob
Date Posted: 26áNová2018 at 9:49am
'Acid Reflux' is the reflux (ie backward flow though a sphincter) of acid, usually referring to the lower oesophageal sphincter. When the stomach is herniated, that reflux can abrade the cardia (part of the stomach the oesophagus attaches to) and the oesophagus.

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http://www.barrettswessex.org.uk - www.barrettswessex.org.uk



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