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Just had 2yr Follow up Endoscope!

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URL: http://www.barrettscampaign.org.uk/forum//forum_posts.asp?TID=1794
Printed Date: 19áOctá2019 at 2:04am


Topic: Just had 2yr Follow up Endoscope!
Posted By: Rogre
Subject: Just had 2yr Follow up Endoscope!
Date Posted: 15áJuná2017 at 3:13pm
Hello All! I'm feeling a little chipper this afternoon as I've just had my first two year follow up endoscopy and it went faster and better than I'd hoped. So I just wanted to share in case there's anyone who is waiting for their first one and is nervous.

I'm a 66 year old male and I was diagnosed with 10cm Barretts and a sliding Hiatus Hernia two years ago after many years of living with heartburn and reflux (I thought it was just one of things one had to live with!). I then started to experience difficulty with swallowing which scared me so very much that I ignored that for three or four years until it was so bad I couldn't ignore it any more. I didn't realise at the time just how much I had adapted my diet and life to expect difficulty swallowing until it stopped. My GP referred me to the local hospital (Pontefract in Yorkshire) and in due course off I went for an endoscope. To say I was terrified is a bit of an understatement. I was actually a mess and had been for some time over this problem. While I waited my GP put me on low dose lansoprasol (15mg twice daily) and it made a huge difference to my life generally and quickly too. It was not nice to be told not to take it for two weeks prior to the endoscope as a lot of my symptoms came back.

I found the first endoscope challenging - fear of the unknown, fear of what might be found, and anxiety about the procedure itself. I elected for local anaesthesia spray as the idea of being 'sleepy' didn't appeal or sound convincing. The feeling that my tongue was swelling up as the spray kicked in was very alarming for me as not being able to breath is a personal nightmare. I found the feeling that I might be choking very unpleasant. However,as I was not actually choking I discovered that breathing calmly, carefully, and deeply to be the thing to focus on. The procedure took a long time as the chap doing it was very thorough - what got me through was to focus purely on doing calm, careful breathing. It wasn't a pleasant experience overall but I think that was due to a combination of all of the factors I've mentioned.

After the endoscope examination I was told I had the Barretts and the HH and a constriction in the upper oesophagus which he thought benign, but he took a biopsy anyway. He also put me onto 30mg Lansoprasol twice a day and told me this was the new normal for me. Previous to this I had been fit and healthy, a stranger to the GP waiting room. It was a shocking change for me. I have to say I spent the next three months or so in a daze worrying about all of this and I was lucky to find this excellent site. I won't say it was a comfort as I was too anxious to make the most of it, but it is an excellent site and I am very grateful for the effort that goes into keeping so. Many thanks.

After 5 weeks my histology came back and confirmed Barretts. Otherwise everything OK. Since then the constriction eased (probably defensive muscle contraction to protect the inflamed area?). Over six months or so I became used to the medication regime and the diagnosis. Acting on the advice on this site, last March when no appointment came for follow up I contacted my GP and asked for one. Six weeks later on here I am - done.

This endoscope was a different experience altogether - I was worried about it on and off all over the past two years, but in the event, whilst it was not actually fun, it was not as upsetting as the first one. I again elected for spray - which didn't seem to be quite so alarming this time. The chap doing it was quick and it all went quickly - in fact my spray was timed at 12.10pm and I was home twenty miles away at 13.10pm when I was allowed to have a post spray drink of water! I was in and out in 15 minutes max - very surprised indeed considering there was 20 or so biopsies taken. He probably wanted his dinner. It wasn't a comfortable way to spend 15 minutes but it was copeable with as he was quick. I have a bit of a bruise on my Rt upper palate as a souvenir and that's all. The constriction has gone (which I knew) and all that could be found on inspection was the 10cm Barretts and a 4cm HH. I have to wait for the histology but I certainly don't feel as stressed and downright distressed as last time. Assuming the cells are normal for Barretts I'll be having another in two years - unless the Tories destroy the NHS in the meantime. I cannot thank the NHS enough.

I hope my experience helps someone.

Thanks to this site, kudos to all those excellent people who keep it going as a light in one's personal darkness.



Replies:
Posted By: nanafran
Date Posted: 15áJuná2017 at 4:39pm
thank you for your post. so encouraging. and best wishes for your results. I agree this is a fantasic group on here. and has helped me a lot


Posted By: jcombs99
Date Posted: 15áJuná2017 at 4:42pm
          I bet ur on to low a dose of 30mg Lan I'm on 60mg lan and had 8cm and 4cm HH like U . Get a second opinion on dose . The NHS was gutted long ago here with barretts they do an EGD every year as in Good healthcare.What u feel or Doctors may C mean little my last EGD came out Fine Doc didn't like it BUT samples were normal ..

Good Luck


Posted By: steveb8189
Date Posted: 15áJuná2017 at 6:35pm
Hi Rogre

Any reason you didn't get on for the sedation? I've had one with and one without sedation and I know which I'll be opting for next time.

Hope the results come back quickly and are all as expected :)


Posted By: GrahamB
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 10:00am
Originally posted by steveb8189

Hi Rogre

Any reason you didn't get on for the sedation? I've had one with and one without sedation and I know which I'll be opting for next time.

Hope the results come back quickly and are all as expected :)


I'm with Steve! Had three OGD + one HALO session over the last nine months. When I first met with my (excellent) specialist we discussed sedation and I asked the simple question - what makes it easier for you (the endoscopist)? The answer was, on balance - taking in to account the effects of sedation - to go for it. Calmer all round, can make the processes faster.

The HALO experience is a different ball game, much heavier sedation as one might expect.

I do have the luxury of post sedation recovery in the private suite as I am being treated under corporate health insurance, not sure if the advice would have been the same if it involved the an NHS endoscopy, those guys are dealing with huge volumes every day and need to keep post procedure beds moving....


Posted By: Rogre
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 11:04am
Thanks for your reply.
When I was asked about sedation or spray first time I was told sedation 'makes you sleepy' which didn't sound convincing to me compared to, say, "it'll knock you out and you won't know a thing" which could have swayed me. Second time it was the same response - it'll make you sleepy. I wasn't convinced - and anyway I'm not someone who likes the thought of not being fully in control of my faculties. Unconscious - OK, doped up - not so sure. As it is I think spray is now familiar, and better the devil you know? Next day after spray the event is already fading into obscurity, maybe I'll review next time.


Posted By: Rogre
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 11:08am
Originally posted by steveb8189

Hi Rogre

Any reason you didn't get on for the sedation? I've had one with and one without sedation and I know which I'll be opting for next time.

Hope the results come back quickly and are all as expected :)


I'm still experimenting with this forum posting business, so if this is a free hanging post - apologies.

When sedated are you aware? Does the endoscope cause a retch? Can you feel the E in your throat? ....... these are the sorts of things that would be nice to know when making the decision.


Posted By: Rogre
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 11:16am
Originally posted by GrahamB

Originally posted by steveb8189

Hi Rogre

Any reason you didn't get on for the sedation? I've had one with and one without sedation and I know which I'll be opting for next time.

Hope the results come back quickly and are all as expected :)


I'm with Steve! Had three OGD + one HALO session over the last nine months. When I first met with my (excellent) specialist we discussed sedation and I asked the simple question - what makes it easier for you (the endoscopist)? The answer was, on balance - taking in to account the effects of sedation - to go for it. Calmer all round, can make the processes faster.

The HALO experience is a different ball game, much heavier sedation as one might expect.

I do have the luxury of post sedation recovery in the private suite as I am being treated under corporate health insurance, not sure if the advice would have been the same if it involved the an NHS endoscopy, those guys are dealing with huge volumes every day and need to keep post procedure beds moving....


Thanks for responding. I can see that you are having a lot of examinations then sedation might well be an excellent option. As I've asked in another response - are you aware under sedation?, Do you have spray when sedated? Can you feel the scope? DO you retch and can you control it? These are the sorts of questions I'd like to know about when making the decision.

I'm hoping your HALO went well. Are there after-effects to that? ... for example, is it sore? can you swallow OK or do you have to have a naso-gastric tube at all?

Like I said I am someone who needs to feel in control and this is the sort of information that I, personally, need to know about if I'm to feel informed and able to cope.


Posted By: Rogre
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 11:19am
Originally posted by nanafran

thank you for your post. so encouraging. and best wishes for your results. I agree this is a fantasic group on here. and has helped me a lot


For me it's all about feeling actively involved and in control of what happens. For that to work then information is necessary. Information is strength! Best wishes.


Posted By: steveb8189
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 12:31pm
For my first scope I had to go back into work afterwards so was concerned about the lingering tiredness - my hospital won't let you home without either putting you in a taxi or someone collecting you. I can remember thinking "ok, great, I'll be able to watch what goes on and have a look at the pictures on the screen in real time - it will be very interesting"... Without sedation as you know it's not a great experience but very manageable. That said, of course I didn't watch the screen, I closed my eyes for the whole thing as watching the endoscope going in seemed to make me gag.

The sedation was a strange experience and I think varies from person to person. My personal experience was as follows.

Wheeled into room
Quick chat with the consultant
IV into arm
Spray in throat
Push drugs (will look up which)
See endoscope going in and getting told to swallow
Kind of feel it in my mouth
<<<<absolutely nothing whatsoever>>>>
See consultant who is having a brief word with me
Imagine he's just about to put the scope in...
Get wheeled out of the room back to recovery

For me, I can fully remember what was said after he took out the endoscope, actually felt like I had a nice rest and was very fresh and ready to go home 30 minutes later feeling brighter than when I got to the hospital.

The strange thing is that you are actually awake the whole time which I struggle to get my head around given I have no recollection of what happened!

Ask for other people's opinions too as I think most people react differently. It may be to do with the dosage of sedation as the anesthetist can vary what they give you. I will certainly take along the details of what they used last time for future reference - it's all documented on the report.


Posted By: jcombs99
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 3:07pm
Steve
   U were awake because they did a Piss Poor Job .I woke up on the first EGD so they stopped it and I had to come back $$$$ . NEVER EVER happened again(32)or it would be FREE .Fool the others told me about the first one .

By the way my Doctor has NEVER RELEASED a person with Barretts that's why they don't show up with Stage 4 CANCER years later .

CHEERs


Posted By: Rogre
Date Posted: 16áJuná2017 at 3:13pm
Originally posted by steveb8189

For my first scope I had to go back into work afterwards so was concerned about the lingering tiredness - my hospital won't let you home without either putting you in a taxi or someone collecting you. I can remember thinking "ok, great, I'll be able to watch what goes on and have a look at the pictures on the screen in real time - it will be very interesting"... Without sedation as you know it's not a great experience but very manageable. That said, of course I didn't watch the screen, I closed my eyes for the whole thing as watching the endoscope going in seemed to make me gag.

The sedation was a strange experience and I think varies from person to person. My personal experience was as follows.

Wheeled into room
Quick chat with the consultant
IV into arm
Spray in throat
Push drugs (will look up which)
See endoscope going in and getting told to swallow
Kind of feel it in my mouth
<<<<absolutely nothing whatsoever>>>>
See consultant who is having a brief word with me
Imagine he's just about to put the scope in...
Get wheeled out of the room back to recovery

For me, I can fully remember what was said after he took out the endoscope, actually felt like I had a nice rest and was very fresh and ready to go home 30 minutes later feeling brighter than when I got to the hospital.

The strange thing is that you are actually awake the whole time which I struggle to get my head around given I have no recollection of what happened!

Ask for other people's opinions too as I think most people react differently. It may be to do with the dosage of sedation as the anesthetist can vary what they give you. I will certainly take along the details of what they used last time for future reference - it's all documented on the report.


That's really useful information and I'm grateful for the share. It would be useful if others would also share their experience of sedation to compare. When I'm due to have my next (hopefully in the far future) I'll bear this in mind.


Posted By: Sandra W
Date Posted: 27áSepá2017 at 2:38pm
Love the "absolutely nothing whatsoever" bit.  Same here.  I get 3 or 4mg Midazolam and 100mcg Fentanyl and never remember a thing until I wake up.  Works every time for me, and for that I am truly thankful! LOL!

Sandra.


-------------
E-mail: swilliams888@hotmail.co.uk


Posted By: steveb8189
Date Posted: 27áSepá2017 at 6:02pm
Had another scope last week with the same drugs. Again, remember pretty much nothing except when they took the scope out and I wretched a little. It's strange because immediately afterwards I thought I remembered everything but then the more and more I thought about it the less and less I remembered until I realised I only remember about 10 seconds worth!

Strange, strange drugs!



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